Writing

Processing 0187

New release available shortly in the pre-releases section of processing.org/download.

More bug fixes, and one new treat for OS X users. Hopefully we’re about set
to call this one 1.2. Please test and report any issues you find.

[ additions ]

+ On Mac OS X, you’re no longer required to have a sketch window open at
all times. This will make the application feel more Mac-like–a little
more elegant and trendy and smug with superiority.

+ Added a warning to the Linux version to tell users that they should be
using the official version of Java from Sun if they’re not.
http://wiki.processing.org/w/Supported_Platforms#Linux
There isn’t a perfect way to detect whether Sun Java is in use,
so please let us know how it works or if you have a better idea.

[ fixes ]

+ “Unexpected token” error when creating classes with recent pre-releases.
http://code.google.com/p/processing/issues/detail?id=292

+ Prevent horizontal scroll offset from disappearing.
Thanks to Christian Thiemann for the fix.
http://code.google.com/p/processing/issues/detail?id=280
http://code.google.com/p/processing/issues/detail?id=10

+ Fix NullPointerException when making a new sketch on non-English systems.
http://code.google.com/p/processing/issues/detail?id=283

+ Fixed a problem when using command-line arguments with exported sketches
on Windows. Thanks to davbol for the fix.
http://code.google.com/p/processing/issues/detail?id=303

+ Added requestFocusInWindow() call to replace Apple’s broken requestFocus(),
which should return the previous behavior of sketches getting focus
immediately when loaded in a web browser.
http://code.google.com/p/processing/issues/detail?id=279

+ Add getDocumentBase() version of createInput() for Internet Explorer.
Without this, sketches will crash when trying to find files on a web server
that are not in the exported .jar file. This fix is only for IE. Yay IE!

Monday, July 12, 2010 | processing  
Book

Visualizing Data Book CoverVisualizing Data is my book about computational information design. It covers the path from raw data to how we understand it, detailing how to begin with a set of numbers and produce images or software that lets you view and interact with information. Unlike nearly all books in this field, it is a hands-on guide intended for people who want to learn how to actually build a data visualization.

The text was published by O’Reilly in December 2007 and can be found at Amazon and elsewhere. Amazon also has an edition for the Kindle, for people who aren’t into the dead tree thing. (Proceeds from Amazon links found on this page are used to pay my web hosting bill.)

Examples for the book can be found here.

The book covers ideas found in my Ph.D. dissertation, which is basis for Chapter 1. The next chapter is an extremely brief introduction to Processing, which is used for the examples. Next is (chapter 3) is a simple mapping project to place data points on a map of the United States. Of course, the idea is not that lots of people want to visualize data for each of 50 states. Instead, it’s a jumping off point for learning how to lay out data spatially.

The chapters that follow cover six more projects, such as salary vs. performance (Chapter 5), zipdecode (Chapter 6), followed by more advanced topics dealing with trees, treemaps, hierarchies, and recursion (Chapter 7), plus graphs and networks (Chapter 8).

This site is used for follow-up code and writing about related topics.

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